NO Lowering

Foods, Supplements and Lifestyle

Since discovering the potential connection between nitric oxide (NO) and TSW, I have been research different ways that I might keep my NO levels low, or at least do my best not to raise them.  This caused me to look at my diet and other behaviors that would help keep NO production low. 

Foods

I looked into foods low in nitrates and nitrites, the precursors to NO production.  I have had very little oozing through this process thus far (1.5 months in).  I also do a loose NMT, so imagine that helps, as well.  Typically, when I see reference to NO foods on popular websites is describing how to raise your NO and the health benefits of that.  People with TSW, however, suffer from elevated NO levels.  Right now I am getting a list together for myself from popular websites and scientific research, but as I get more into this, I will try to replace the popular sites with all research.  I have organized these foods into the following categories:  foods that produce high amounts of NO, low amounts of NO, foods that are commonly recognized as inflammatory, and typical eczema triggers.  I tried to eat low NO foods, and avoid most trigger foods to get the best possible results for myself.

As mentioned, I will continue to do research to make this list more and more accurate based on the latest reasearch and make notes when I come across conflicting information.  Some of the reference links may go to abstracts of the journal article.  Contact me if you need more info.

Low NO FOODS

< 20 mg nitrates/100 gm:

Artichoke

 

Asparagus

 

Broad bean

 

Eggplant

 

Garlic

 

Onion

 

Green bean

 

Mushroom

 

Pea

 

Pepper

 

Potato

 

Summer squash

 

Sweet potato

 

Tomato

 

Watermelon (conflicting info)
 

20 to < 50 mg nitrates/100 gm:

Broccoli

 

Carrot

 

Cauliflower

 

Cucumber

 

Pumpkin

 

Chicory

Another source:

Apples, apple sauce

Pork tenderloin

Ketchup

 

French fries

Kidney beans

HIGH NO FOODS

Leafy greens (spinach, kale, arugula)

Lettuce

Endive

Cabbage

Beetroot

Dark chocolate

Watermelon (have seen this on low NO lists, also)

Pomegranate

Celery

Celeriac

Fennel

Leek

Cress

Cilantro (Boohoo)

Parsley

Rhubarb

Spirulina

HIGH IN L-arginine:

Turkey

Beef

Soy beans

Seaweed

Walnuts, hazelnuts, peanuts, almonds, pine nuts,

Seeds (pumpkin, sunflower, sesame)

 

 

INFLAMMATORY FOODS

Added sugars:

Cookies

Candies

Breads


Crackers


Granola bars


Salad dressings

Soda

Added sugar fruit juice

Alcohol

Processed meats:

Bacon


Hot dogs


Meat jerkies


Pepperoni


Salami


Sausage


Some deli meats

Refined carbs:

Breads and rolls   

 

Crackers

French fries

Sugary cereals
 

White rice

ECZEMA TRIGGERS

Cow’s milk

 

Egg

 

Soybean

Wheat gluten

Citrus

Tomatoes

Spice such as cinnamon, vanilla, and cloves

Some types of nuts

Nickel content (found in):

 

Beans

 

Lentils

 

Shellfish

 

Soy

 

Chocolate

 

Coffee

 

Spinach

Propylene Glycol (thickener, found in):

Salad dressings

Snacks

 

Baked goods

 

Beverages

 


Formaldehyde:

from aspartame

UVA

Exercise

Mouthwash & Nitrites/Nitrates

"Approximately 25% of ingested nitrate is secreted in saliva, where some 20% (or ≈5–8% of the nitrate intake) is converted to nitrite by commensal bacteria on the tongue (36). These anaerobic bacteria on the dorsal surface of the tongue use nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor to produce energy. Indeed, use of an antibacterial mouthwash after consumption of dietary nitrate (10 mg/kg in water) attenuates the expected postprandial rise in plasma nitrite (37). In the proximal small intestine, nitrate is rapidly absorbed with high bioavailability (100%) (38). The nitrite supplied to the gastrointestinal tract serves to enhance gastric mucin production (39) and can serve as a substrate for generation of nitrogen oxides for antimicrobial actions and support of gastric homeostasis (40)"

"Recently, nitric oxide synthesis in healthy tissues has been shown to occur independently of the l-arginine–NOS pathway (41); dietary provision of nitrates and nitrites may account for approximately half of steady state nitric oxide concentrations. Because inorganic nitrate is considered a biologically inert compound, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite is necessary for nitrite to serve as a substrate for nitric oxide production."

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/90/1/1/4596750

- DOI:  10.3945/ajcn.2008.27131